SUSTAINABILITY

sustainability report 2017

In our 2016 YTL Group Sustainability Report written before the USA presidential election, I highlighted the risks of protectionism and political crises and the resulting impacts on global efforts to reduce emissions. So far the scenario played out on the global environmental and sustainability stage has been thought-provoking to say the least. However, despite the alarming policy shifts, it is encouraging to see how organisations and the community at large have provided leadership, and also direction at this challenging time. It is this collaborative action and utilisation of technology that I am going to address in six separate sections dealing with the trends and also our role as a conglomerate in the liberalisation of energy markets, the future of carbon pricing, offtake agreements, the aggregation of supply and demand for renewable energy, food and other waste, and how electric vehicles will likely change the way we generate, store, distribute and use energy. This resonates well with our SDG commitments to SDG 4 – Quality Education, SDG 8 – Decent Work and Economic Growth, SDG 12 – Responsible Consumption and Production, SDG 13 – Climate Action and SDG 14 – Life below Water
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ARCHIVE
sustainability report 2016

Last year I wrote about our concerns regarding the impact of geopolitical rivalry on the environment, communities and global stability. In addition to competition for ever more scarce resources such as food and fuel, there is the additional risk of fragmentation and isolationist sovereignty. The risks to international cooperation have been heightened by the United Kingdom’s (UK’s) vote to leave the European Union (EU), and climate change could be one of the victims as we shift to a more volatile multipolar world where threats of resource security becomes a priority for most countries. In the fallout from BREXIT, Britain’s new Prime Minister, Theresa May has already scrapped the Ministry for Climate Change, and there could be other casualties in fragmentation. Extreme weather could still play a part in driving local agendas to mitigate climate change risks, but protectionism and political crises could still pose a challenge for global cooperation on reducing carbon emissions.
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sustainability report 2015

At YTL, we are constantly seeking and integrating more sustainable technologies and renewable energy sources across our diverse range of businesses. We also recognise our role in the global business community and as a leader in a number of our initiatives from Java to Bristol and beyond. Long-term goals are just as critical as short-term targets, which is why we position ourselves to balance the interests of all stakeholders across varying time frames.
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sustainability report 2014

The consumption of natural resources remains a core concern for our stakeholders and the YTL Group for innumerable reasons. Whilst supply chain participants such as coffee farmers, mining companies, contract manufacturers and energy companies are able to communicate with their stakeholders, natural capital does not have a clear nor audible voice. As the population continues to deplete natural resources at an accelerating rate, territorial disputes continue to escalate and spill over from the locales of those resources to urban landscapes, the communities therein and commercial interests. The effects of these geopolitical disputes has created widening ripples and sometimes tragic consequences.
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sustainability report 2013

The debate on anthropogenic impacts on the environment continues to rage. We nevertheless remain firm in our belief that mitigating these impacts regardless of the causes of climate change is a priority for the YTL Group and our stakeholders.
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sustainability report 2012

At YTL, sustainable practices and taking a responsible approach to all facets of our business is at the heart of the Group's strategy. As a global infrastructure conglomerate, mitigating impacts on society and the environment continue to be a priority.
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sustainability report 2011

You may have observed that our world is changing at an unprecedented rate. Global consumption of natural resources could almost triple to 140 billion tons a year by 2050 unless nations take drastic steps, as the United Nation issued a warning this year. Weather disasters in the poorest nations have trebled since the 1980s and carbon emissions have also reached highest ever levels, with unpublished estimates from the International Energy Agency (IEA) revealing that the world economy´s return to growth in 2010 coincided with a 1.6 gigatonne rise in carbon dioxide emissions, the highest ever recorded.
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sustainability report 2010

Globally, it can be observed that the world's biggest companies are attempting to make their businesses more sustainable despite the worst recession since the 1930s. A report for the United Nations in June 2010 showed that 93% of the world's top chief executives view sustainability as important to their company's future success.
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sustainability report 2009

According to a McKinsey Report, of the world's 100 largest economic entities, 63 are corporations, not countries. Great power creates great expectations and society increasingly holds businesses accountable as the only institutions strong enough to meet the significant long-term challenges facing our earth. It therefore becomes more than a corporate responsibility and instead becomes crucial for corporate survival.
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sustainability report 2008

We are indeed living in interesting times. Fragile global economies, subprime, banking crises, poverty, rising fuel prices and climate change are frightening realities and intense challenges that we are all experiencing, all within the same century.
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sustainability report 2007

Corporate social responsibility and sustainable development are key activities that are very close to my heart, thus it has been a core issue at YTL for many years now. It is not a "cause" that we simply adopted, but instead a commitment that hinges on our responsibility as one of the leading infrastructure conglomerates in Asia.
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sustainability report 2006

It is imperative that developments are sustainable for our own economic welfare otherwise we are cursing future generations with our negligence as we are now cursed by previous generations of political and business leaders who did not pay attention to sustainability.
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